The Warning Signs of a Painkiller Addiction

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Many believe that medications approved by the US Federal Drug Administration and prescribed by a licensed physician are safe. Sadly, this is not always entirely true. Prescription painkillers are an example of medications that can be pretty dangerous, mainly if prescribed incorrectly or without the appropriate education. The misuse of prescription pain killers, or opioids, is a crisis in the United States that results in the deaths of over a hundred people every day. Knowing the warning signs of a painkiller addiction may be the thing that saves your life or the life of someone you love. At Marina Harbor Detox, we know how quickly painkiller use can progress from appropriate use to misuse and even addiction. We are here to help you put down the pills and take back your life. 

What Are Painkillers? 

Nearly all painkillers belong to the opioid drug class. This class of drugs binds to the receptors that regulate pain but also pleasure. Examples of prescription opioids are oxycodone, codeine, Dilaudid, fentanyl, and morphine. If you are prescribed painkillers following an injury or surgery, it is essential to take them as prescribed. It is also vital to secure them and dispose of any leftover pills properly to prevent others from taking them. It is crucial to know the warning signs of painkiller addiction, but it is also vital to know the symptoms of an opioid overdose. Opioid overdose has three key indicators – unconsciousness, pinpoint pupils and slowed breathing.  If you suspect that someone has overdosed on opioids, call 911 immediately. 

Are Painkillers Addictive?

The hydrocodone prescribed following your dental surgery will likely treat your pain, but it will also cause your brain to release dopamine. Dopamine is a chemical in our brains that produces feelings of pleasure. These feelings of pleasure can inadvertently reinforce taking the drug, which can lead to misuse and addiction. In addition, painkillers can be addictive physically and psychologically. If your body has become dependent on opioids, you may experience diarrhea, muscle cramps, a runny nose, and gooseflesh when you stop taking the pills. Other warning signs of painkiller addiction include not being able to complete tasks or focus without taking the medications. 

The Warning Signs of a Painkiller Addiction To Look Out For

Some of the warning signs of painkiller addiction can be very subtle, while others are more obvious. Some are behavioral, and others are physical. One of the most well-known signs is pinpoint or constricted pupils. You may also notice that you are experiencing anxiety when waiting to take the next prescribed pill. You may also find yourself counting how many pills you have left or overstating your pain to your physician to have more drugs prescribed. Painkiller use affects the whole body. Opioids are known for slowing down your gastrointestinal system and causing constipation, cramping, and nausea. Prescription painkillers can also result in low blood pressure or decreased respirations, showing up as paleness, clammy skin, sweating, or even blue lips. The misuse of opioids can also reduce your ability to feel pain and pleasure because your brain’s pathways will be changed by regular opioid use. 

How Marina Harbor Detox Can Help 

Despite your best intentions, you still may find yourself addicted to painkillers. The good news is that you can recover. You don’t have to keep taking the pills. At Marina Harbor Detox, our team of medical professionals understands what it takes to recover from addiction. We provide a luxurious, intimate setting that relies on individualized care and a low patient-to-staff ratio. In addition, we will provide you with a structured, supportive environment to enable you to create life in long-term recovery. Contact us today to start your recovery journey.

NAD Therapy Explained

NAD Therapy Explained

Today, more than ever before, you have a range of therapy options for overcoming addiction. If you are struggling with drug or alcohol abuse, NAD