The Cocaine Use Behavioral Signs To Look Out For

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin

You know the people you love better than anyone else, and you know when something is wrong. And while your first thought may not be that they are using drugs, it’s vital to know the signs of addiction. As you try to understand what sorts of activities your loved one is engaged in, you may feel a bit like a detective. You’ll want to research to understand what drug use looks like including cocaine use behavioral signs. You’ll also want to understand what sorts of drug paraphernalia to be looking for and what cocaine addiction looks like. Knowing the signs of different drugs will help you determine what drug your loved one may be using. At Marina Harbor Detox, we understand how devastating it can be to realize that your loved one is using and addicted to drugs. We are here to partner with you and your family to help your loved one find their way away from addiction and into recovery. 

What Is Cocaine? 

Cocaine belongs to the stimulant class of drugs and has a long history. Cocaine was originally used as an ingredient in an early formulation of Coca-Cola and as a way to block pain during surgical procedures. Today, we understand the addictive nature of cocaine, and that is why it is a Schedule II drug. It can still be administered by a doctor in very specific circumstances but has a highly addictive nature. Cocaine is a white powder, and it is often hard to know its potency because it can be mixed with other substances such as cornstarch, baking powder, or other drugs. Those who use cocaine will often snort the powder. Others will mix the powder with ammonia or baking soda and water before heating it to produce a smokable substance. Once the cocaine has been changed into a smokable substance, it is considered freebasing or smoking crack. Cocaine can also be injected, which results in a faster and potentially more intense high.  Cocaine use behavioral signs may vary depending on how the cocaine was ingested, but nearly all cocaine users will have extreme highs and lows.

Is Cocaine Addictive?

As is the case with other substances, cocaine increases the dopamine in the brain, and it is this effect that most cocaine users are chasing. Cocaine and other drugs impact the pathways in the brain in such a way that the user’s baseline changes. Over time, those who use cocaine will not experience much joy from everyday activities that previously brought them joy unless they continue to use it. Eating, having sex, and interacting with friends will all bring a decreased amount of pleasure because the brain pathways are altered by regular drug use. The changes in the brain pathways are a large part of what makes cocaine addictive. The individual has to use more and more cocaine to achieve the same effect. These changes also create the cocaine behavioral signs that are the telltale signs of cocaine use. 

The Cocaine Behavioral Signs To Look Out For in a Loved One

When someone is using cocaine regularly, their entire personality can change. Short-term cocaine behavioral signs include extreme happiness, increased energy, increased alertness, irritability, and paranoia. However, these effects can disappear as quickly as they come on, which is another reason people find themselves using more and more cocaine. The physical signs of cocaine use include dilated pupils, increased body temperature, restlessness, tremors, and muscle twitches. Cocaine’s long-term effects will somewhat depend on how it is ingested. Those who snort it may experience loss of smell and nosebleeds, while those who smoke it will experience coughing and a higher risk of infections. 

How Marina Harbor Detox Can Help 

While it is heartbreaking, relapse does happen. The good news is that you or your loved one can return from a relapse. You don’t have to keep drinking. At Marina Harbor Detox, our team of medical professionals understands what it takes to recover from addiction and to return from a relapse. We provide a luxurious, intimate setting that relies on individualized care and a low patient-to-staff ratio. In addition, we will provide you with a structured, supportive environment to enable you to create life in long-term recovery. Contact us today to start your recovery journey.

What Does MAT Mean in Rehab?

What Does MAT Mean in Rehab

There are different programs for anyone struggling with substance abuse, and the right treatment is the one that leads to the highest rate of long-term